Avelar Promotes Student Debt Relief Programs

Thu Oct 20 2022 17:00:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Avelar Promotes Student Debt Relief Programs
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BOLINGBROOK, Ill. – State Rep. Dagmara “Dee” Avelar wants to call attention to applications for federal programs aimed at relieving student loan debt. The one-time student loan debt cancellation program and the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program both have applications currently open for borrowers to apply for debt relief.

“I have seen the toll that paying back student loans can take on families and individuals alike,” Avelar said. “These programs aim to provide desperately needed relief in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, rising inflation rates and the high cost of education in general.”

The one-time student loan debt cancellation program was announced by President Biden in August and seeks to relieve millions of borrowers from portions of their loan debt. For individuals making less than $125,000 a year, and households making less than $250,000, borrowers are eligible to receive $10,000 of loan forgiveness. Those who received Federal Pell Grants will have $20,000 of relief available to them. Applications for one-time debt cancellation can be found on studentaid.gov and are due by Dec. 31, 2023.

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program has also been briefly expanded. To be eligible for this program, one must work for a qualifying employer and make 120 qualifying payments to receive debt forgiveness. The Limited Waiver to expand eligibility will allow payments that did not previously qualify to be applied to the program. More information on qualifications of employment and payments, as well as the application, can be found on studentaid.gov or isac.org/pslf. Applications are due by Oct. 31, 2022.

“These programs strive to assist low and middle-income families to pay off their student debt through a fast and simple application process, ” Avelar said. “I strongly encourage all who qualify to apply for these loan forgiveness programs and save thousands of dollars in student debt.”